Poseidon’s daughter calls to the sea
And the sea comes rushing, pressing, pounding
Drumming a rhythm upon the rocks
And Poseidon’s daughter smiles
Nursed with salt water at the bosom of the Mother
She inhales foam, and exhales sand
Forming with her breath the shifting beach
Upon which the grove stands and rests
Awaiting always the call of her father
She runs to his voice, and dives below
Sinking into the dark and cold
To her as welcoming as the womb
Poseidon’s daughter calls to the sea
Lost in trance and at one with the waves
Her words are carried on salt-laden breezes
And the sea calls back.
—Erin Fortner
Photo by Christina Marvel during a Druid Moon ritual for Poseidon

Poseidon’s daughter calls to the sea

And the sea comes rushing, pressing, pounding

Drumming a rhythm upon the rocks

And Poseidon’s daughter smiles

Nursed with salt water at the bosom of the Mother

She inhales foam, and exhales sand

Forming with her breath the shifting beach

Upon which the grove stands and rests

Awaiting always the call of her father

She runs to his voice, and dives below

Sinking into the dark and cold

To her as welcoming as the womb

Poseidon’s daughter calls to the sea

Lost in trance and at one with the waves

Her words are carried on salt-laden breezes

And the sea calls back.

—Erin Fortner

Photo by Christina Marvel during a Druid Moon ritual for Poseidon

The whispers of the autumn winds singOf the rise of the moonThey carry the scent of woodsmokeAnd the sound of the wolf over the hillsideThe geese fly silently aboveA specter of changeIn starlight and the approaching frost.The world under our feet sounds crispWith the crunch of leavesAnd the scurry of nest makers in the undergrowth.If you listen closely,You can hear the goddess whisper in the treesHer songs are full of harvest…and love.
Image and poem by Christina Marvel, ADF Member

The whispers of the autumn winds sing
Of the rise of the moon
They carry the scent of woodsmoke
And the sound of the wolf over the hillside
The geese fly silently above
A specter of change
In starlight and the approaching frost.

The world under our feet sounds crisp
With the crunch of leaves
And the scurry of nest makers in the undergrowth.
If you listen closely,
You can hear the goddess whisper in the trees
Her songs are full of harvest
…and love.

Image and poem by Christina Marvel, ADF Member

The oath of our priesthood is neither secret nor complex. We say: I swear to Honor the Gods, to love the Land and to serve the Folk, and to this honor, love and service I dedicate my hands, my heart and my head.
Even as we build the national Pagan religious organization that helps make those goals real in the common world, so we build the relationships with the Shining Ones, the Middle-World co-dwellers, and the Mighty Dead. May what we work on the Inner become true in the mortal world, and the old ways be renewed!
—Ian Corrigan
Read More

The oath of our priesthood is neither secret nor complex. We say: I swear to Honor the Gods, to love the Land and to serve the Folk, and to this honor, love and service I dedicate my hands, my heart and my head.

Even as we build the national Pagan religious organization that helps make those goals real in the common world, so we build the relationships with the Shining Ones, the Middle-World co-dwellers, and the Mighty Dead. May what we work on the Inner become true in the mortal world, and the old ways be renewed!

—Ian Corrigan

Read More

From Three Cranes Grove, ADF’s, Autumnal Equinox rite, a good fire, brightened with offerings!
What does it mean to “pray with a good fire?”
"May you pray with a good fire" is a line from the Rgveda that many ADF Druids have adopted to describe particular aspects of their practice, and has several layers of meaning.
In ADF ritual, a fire is understood to exist that burns at the center of all things, and it is at that fire that we speak our prayers to the Spirits and make offerings.
ADF Druidry is about reciprocal relationships with deities, and part of that is the making of offerings and giving of gifts: many of these gifts are given to the fire, which transforms them into something the Spirits can use. Because you can pray with both words and actions, the giving of gifts to the fire is a prayer unto itself.
There is a notion of the “fire of piety” that burns within us, helping us to lift our voice in prayer and song. This is the fire that burns in our hearts.
And many others find deeper meanings as well. In the end, to “pray with a good fire” is a phrase that means simply: “Doing honor to the Spirits in a manner that brightens both them and us.” It is the center of what we call “*Ghosti" in ADF: the guest-host relationship between humans and spirits.
Learn more about Druidry at adf.org!

From Three Cranes Grove, ADF’s, Autumnal Equinox rite, a good fire, brightened with offerings!

What does it mean to “pray with a good fire?”

"May you pray with a good fire" is a line from the Rgveda that many ADF Druids have adopted to describe particular aspects of their practice, and has several layers of meaning.

  1. In ADF ritual, a fire is understood to exist that burns at the center of all things, and it is at that fire that we speak our prayers to the Spirits and make offerings.

  2. ADF Druidry is about reciprocal relationships with deities, and part of that is the making of offerings and giving of gifts: many of these gifts are given to the fire, which transforms them into something the Spirits can use. Because you can pray with both words and actions, the giving of gifts to the fire is a prayer unto itself.

  3. There is a notion of the “fire of piety” that burns within us, helping us to lift our voice in prayer and song. This is the fire that burns in our hearts.

And many others find deeper meanings as well. In the end, to “pray with a good fire” is a phrase that means simply: “Doing honor to the Spirits in a manner that brightens both them and us.” It is the center of what we call “*Ghosti" in ADF: the guest-host relationship between humans and spirits.

Learn more about Druidry at adf.org!

Cernunnos on the Nautes Altar

One of our members, Ceisiwr Serith, put together a great paper on the god Cernunnos and presented it at the Harvard Celtic Colloquium in 2003. If you have an interest in the iconography or character of Cernunnos, this paper is a must-read.

ADF has always had an emphasis on scholarship and understanding the past, and Cei’s work has been one of the shining lights of that drive.

Check out his website for more great work, and learn more about Druidry at adf.org!

Are you in the Northwestern United States or Southwestern Canadian Provinces? If so, you might be particularly interested in the regional blog from that area. Find out what’s going on in that neck of the woods, Druid-wise, and learn about the people behind ADF who are doing the work on the ground!

Learn more about Druidry at adf.org!